The Mercer’s Maiden in Dryden Street, London WC2

From Wikipedia:

“The origin of the “Mercers’ Maiden”, the heraldic emblem of the Worshipful Company of Mercers, is not known. Unlike most of the City livery companies, the Mercers had no early grant of arms but the 1425 charter granted a common seal. A few impressions of the early seal survive showing a greatly simplified version of the present coat of arms. The fifteenth century Wardens’ Accounts reveal that, even then, the Company required the device of the Maid’s Head to be displayed on its property. In 1530 the Company stated to the College of Heralds that they had no arms but only a Maid’s Head for their common seal and in 1568 the Heralds registered the seal as the company’s arms.

In 1911 the College of Arms confirmed the arms and granted the company a crest and motto, ‘Honor Deo’ (Honour to God). The grant blazons the arms: Gules, issuant from a bank of clouds a figure of the Virgin couped at the shoulders proper vested in a crimson robe adorned with gold the neck encircled by a jeweled necklace crined or and wreathed about the temples with a chaplet of roses alternately argent and of the first and crowned with a celestial crown the whole within a bordure of clouds also proper.”

Grainhouse, Dryden Street

See below – Note 16: “Mercers maidens and historic metalwork restored.”

https://docs.planning.org.uk/20210519/115/QT08RDRPJSE00/ssdf9j9beysc8e0i.pdf

https://www.archdaily.com/634016/donmar-dryden-street-haworth-tompkins

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